Washing Machine Repair: When to DIY, and When to Call in an Appliance Repair Service

Is your washing machine giving you trouble? A broken washing machine can be quite the headache, forcing you to lug loads of laundry to the nearest laundromat or spend valuable time hand washing items in the sink.

If your machine is on the fritz, you may be inclined to rush out and buy a new washer. Washing machine replacement can be very expensive, though, and when you factor in time for researching features and scheduling delivery and hookup, much of the convenience associated with a new unit is lost. If you’re looking to save money and time, washing machine repair is your best bet.

Some washing machine repairs are simple enough for you to handle yourself, while others require the expertise of a professional appliance repair technician. How can you tell which repair issues are suitable for a DIY job, and which to leave to the pros? Let’s break it down by looking at some of the most common washer issues:

Leaks
A leaking washing machine often evokes feelings of panic, and with good reason. The combination of soap, water, and intricate electrical wiring and digital panels is a volatile one. Add in the potential for water damage to floors and the surrounding surfaces, and you’ve got a recipe for disaster. Fortunately, most washer leaks are  sua may cnc   easy and inexpensive to resolve.

The first thing you’ll want to do is unplug your washing machine to ensure your safety. Check the door seals and gaskets for any wear and tear, especially in front-loading machines. If you see water leaking from the front of the machine, it’s a clear sign that the door gasket needs to be replaced. Most gaskets can easily be swapped out by the average homeowner; just check your washing machine repair manual for the correct part number.

If your door seal is in good condition, or you notice water leaking from the back or underneath the machine, there’s a good chance the leak is originating from the water inlet hoses on the back of the washer. Simply tighten the connections between the machine and the hot and cold hookups, and you should be good to go. If neither of these fixes solves the problem, your machine may be overfilling due to a malfunctioning water level sensor. Due to the complex electronic components involved, this is a washing machine repair best left to the professionals.

 

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